Feel Good About Ignoring These 5 Design Fads

Feel Good About Ignoring These 5 Design Fads

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Feel Good About Ignoring These 5 Design Fads

An idea may look good on paper, but may not necessarily make your home more livable or add value. Make every dollar count by heeding this advice from the experts at Money Magazine.
The great Great-Room Craze was all about openness with little or no distinction between rooms. The theory was that everyone should happily
congregate in one free-flowing space. Plus, it made your house look gigantic. Windows and doorways floating up to the second story space looks grand, but a little bit like a hotel lobby. With so much glass, you can boil in the summer and freeze in the winter (to say nothing of the bills such a design can generate).
Then there's the "all-together" thing. Cooking, game playing, conversation
and TV viewing add up to lots of noise you can't get away from. A better option is to properly arrange a group of normal size rooms using French and sliding doors to close rooms off when necessary. In the end you wind up with as much square footage as in a great room but with more options and a more intimate, livable feel.
     Typical great-room construction: $150 to $350 a square foot
     Building a collection of normal rooms: $125 to $250 a square foot
Many post-WW. II suburban kitchens were cramped but the response has been wildly disproportionate. People think they need enough space to cook banquets for 16. Every day. Besides, it sounds a little intimidating for the cook; or should I say "Chef?"
What's more useful is a layout that lets you easily cook a Monday-night dinner. The perfect kitchen feels spacious but keeps everything close at hand. It's important to create a sensible layout with no more than two steps between every countertop and no more than three steps between the work triangle of sink, oven and refrigerator. Remember the following figures when thinking about designing your dream kitchen.
        Typical kitchen cabinet: $200 to $800         |      Counter surfaces: $20 to $150 a square foot
If you have three cars, the one-car garage just isn't going to work. But beware the three-car garage in its traditional side-by-side configuration. The focus should be your house, not a gigantic box that dwarfs it. Design a more modest two-car garage with a hidden third bay (in the rear, perpendicular to
the primary bays) or separate the third garage space from the other two. Doubling as a garden shed, the new structure adds utility while giving the entryway a cozy "courtyard" feel.
It is nice to have a porch, especially one that's screened in. But placement is often a problem. The space that most homeowners think of first is usually the front, as in "front porch. " But if your porch is right outside the living room, whatever breezes and light the room used to get have now
vanished. Views are ruined and you turn what should be a destination into a passageway. Why not place the outdoor space to the side, along an otherwise viewless hallway or kitchen? That way, you're extending the living space. Due to challenges with roof scapes, you'll need an architect to add your porch in the right place. You'll pay 15% more than you would for a porch added to the front of the house.
Many pre-WW II homes had almost no fixed lighting. The fad response was most often built-in lighting solutions. Recessing light fixtures into the ceiling can flood a room with light but it's not always appropriate to the space.
Track lighting has its own set of problems, especially with lower ceilings. A well-lit room has multiple sources of illumination (ambient, accent and task). Use the walls of your room as space for sconces while adding floor outlets so you can place lamps beside a loveseat or table. Combine these elements with switches and dimmers to create different moods at the twist of a knob
        12 ceiling fixtures, installed: $1,800         |         Three sconces, two outlets, installed: $900
MAIN ARTICLE ADAPTED FROM: "5 dumbest renovation fads," by Duo Dickinson, Money Magazine contributing writer.

William Moore Realtor
Exit Trinity RealtyVoted "Most Awesome".Ph: 740-814-6372


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Author:
Phone: 740-814-6372
Dated: January 26th 2017
Views: 294
About Bill: Bill is an Ohio native and graduate of The Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business. With e...

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